Brief Bio

Alex Plows

Currently based near Bangor in north west Wales, I live with my partner and our teenage daughter, and have a long history of community involvement. I have been the Chair of Governors of Ysgol Rhiwlas, Gwynedd, for the last 2 years.

In my career I have developed specialist and wide-ranging experience and expertise, and I have extensive local, national and  international contacts in academic, policy and civil society spheres.

I am enjoying using my academic knowledge and skills, and grassroots “savvy” in my new career as a consultant.

For relaxation I read, climb, walk, play music, dance,  and am learning to speak Welsh. Dwi’n mwynhau siarad Cymraeg – hapus i cael y cyfle i ymarfer fy Ngymraeg.

After reading English at Goldsmiths in London, for several years I was a grassroots environmental activist and campaigner, catalysing ‘green action’ and associated environmental awareness in the 1990s, before taking a doctorate at Bangor University followed by teaching on a range of advanced degree courses in Sustainable Development, Environmental Management and the study of social movements.

Alex Plows on glacier

I then became a Research Assistant and Research Associate on a number of ESRC projects, such as mapping UK eco-activist networks in different places and over generations, and developing regionally specific sustainable development indicators and identifying good practice.

For six years I was a Research Associate at the ESRC funded Centre for the Economic and Social Aspects of Genomics (Cesagen) working on their flagship project ‘The Emerging Politics of Human Genetic Technologies’ which traced the engagement of different ‘prime movers’ with a variety of human genetics innovations and applications, before becoming a Research Fellow at the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD), Bangor University.

I can be contacted at alexplowsconsultancy@hotmail.co.uk

(The picture on the right was taken whilst walking a glacier in Iceland in 2011. This ice sheet is melting by dozens of metres every year)